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Reception: Thursday, June 27 from 12–8pm & Friday, June 28 from 12–6pm

DOCUMENT is pleased to announce our participation in Condo New York 2019 and would like to thank Marinaro Gallery for the invitation to exhibit a selection of our gallery artists in her exhibition space. The presentation will include works by John Opera, Mary Helena Clark and Sterling Lawrence whom have had numerous solo exhibitions at DOCUMENT. A reception will be held on Thursday, June 27th from 5-8 pm.


JOHN OPERA combines a deep interest in the visual characteristics of natural and scientific phenomena with a rigorous experimental approach to the techniques and apparatuses by which photographs have been defined and produced in. Opera often returns to antiquated—but by no means exhausted—photographic tools and processes, including pinhole imaging, and more recently the cyanotype and anthotype.

MARY HELENA CLARK is an artist working in film, video, and installation. Her work uses the language of collage, often bringing together disparate subjects and styles that suggest an exterior logic or code, to explore dissociative states through cinema. Working with quotation, the materiality of film, and incongruous sound/image relationships, Clark’s recent work explores shifting subjectivities and the limits of the embodied camera. Her films, such as After Writing (2008), And the sun flowers (2009), Sound Over Water (2009), By foot-candle light (2011), The Plant (2012), Orpheus (outtakes) (2012) and The Dragon is the Frame (2014), have been screened at International Film Festival Rotterdam, New York Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus), Vox Populi (Philadelphia), Anthology Film Archives (New York), Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago), National Gallery of Art (Washington DC), and the Brooklyn Academy of Music, among others.

STERLING LAWRENCE reconstructs forms and images that belong to an aesthetic of everyday objects and backdrops whose purpose is to “streamline” and “enhance” our environment. In doing so, Lawrence’s work speaks to how bodies connect and relate to constructed spaces and designed objects exploring psychological, economic, and political histories. Taking influence from consumer culture and inconspicuous moments in architecture, Lawrence’s work often lays reverence for the viewer to claim description. Sculptures whose outward form exaggerate, mute, and or distort function complicate their imagined and therefore suggested utility. Most recently, Lawrence has been producing a series of monochrome wall works entitled “domesticated architecture”. This series takes influence from craftsman homes found in the artist’s home town and Patrick Caulfield’s serigraph prints from the 60’s and 70’s. The reliefs mimic the use of “flats,” a graphic building block used in printmaking. In “domesticated architecture,” grid structures support and organize silhouette flats that shadow the original source and Lawrence’s background in printmaking.

Gordon Hall

Gordon Hall is an artist based in New York. Hall’s sculptures and performances have been exhibited at SculptureCenter, The Renaissance Society, Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, Movement Research, EMPAC, Art in General, Temple Contemporary, Foxy Production, Hessel Museum at Bard College, White Columns, Wysing Arts Centre, Abrons Arts Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, The Drawing Center, and Chapter NY, among others. Hall’s first institutional solo show, The Number of Inches Between Them, took place at the MIT List Center for Visual Arts in 2018, for which a catalog by the same title was released at Printed Matter, New York. Hall’s second institutional solo exhibition, THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH, opened in June of 2019 at Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, who also published OVER-BELIEFS, Collected Writing 2011-2018, an edited book of Hall’s collected essays, performance scripts, and interviews. Gordon Hall has organized lecture and performance programs at MoMA PS1, Recess, Interstate Projects, The Shandaken Project at Storm King Art Center, and at the Whitney Museum of American Art, producing a series of lectures and seminars in conjunction with the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Hall’s writings and interviews have been featured in a variety of publications including Artforum, Art in America, V Magazine, Randy, Bomb, Title Magazine, Walker Art Center’s Artist Op-Ed Series, What About Power? Inquiries Into Contemporary Sculpture (published by SculptureCenter, 2015), Documents of Contemporary Art: Queer(published by Whitechapel and MIT Press, 2016), and Theorizing Visual Studies (Routledge, 2012). Hall was awarded a LMCC Process Space Residency, a Triangle Arts Foundation Residency, the LMCC Workspace Residency, an Edward F. Albee Foundation residency, and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, ACRE, and the Fire Island Artist Residency. In 2018 Hall was awarded a Production and Presentation Grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to support List Projects: Gordon Hall at the MIT List Center for Visual Arts. Hall holds an MFA and an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from Hampshire College. Hall is a 2019-2020 Provost Teaching Fellow in the Department of Sculpture at Rhode Island School of Design.

Brothers and Sisters, 2018 Cast pigmented concrete, hand-dyed cotton, wood, hand-glazed tile mosaic, colored pencil, brick, and mortar Dimensions variable with installation

Brothers and Sisters, 2018 Cast pigmented concrete, hand-dyed cotton, wood, hand-glazed tile mosaic, colored pencil, brick, and mortar Dimensions variable with installation

Brothers and Sisters, 2018 Cast pigmented concrete, hand-dyed cotton, wood, hand-glazed tile mosaic, colored pencil, brick, and mortar Dimensions variable with installation

Brothers and Sisters, 2018 Cast pigmented concrete, hand-dyed cotton, wood, hand-glazed tile mosaic, colored pencil, brick, and mortar Dimensions variable with installation

Brothers and Sisters (II), 2018, Cast pigmented concrete 16 3/4 x 7 x 17 1/2 inches (42.5 x 17.8 x 44.5 cm)

Brothers and Sisters (I), 2018 Cast pigmented concrete and wood 11 1/8 x 14 x 11 1/2 inches (28.3 x 35.6 x 29.2 cm)

Brothers and Sisters (I), 2018 Kneeling (Brick Object)(II), 2018 Brick and mortar 10 1/4 x 11 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches (26 x 29.2 x 41.9 cm)

Brothers and Sisters (I), 2018 Fold (II), 2018 Hand-dyed cotton 2 1/8 x 104 x 28 3/4 inches (5.4 x 264.2 x 73 cm)

AND PER SAY AND Wood, joint compound, wood filler, cast cement, color pencil, acrylic and latex paint, denim, hand dyed cotton, modeling clay, tile mosaic. Performance with projected video and sound 58 min. 13’ x 23’ x 36’. 2016.

THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH, 2019, Performance at The Portland Institute of Contemporary Art

THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH, 2019, Performance at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art

Closed Box with Painted Top, 2019 Cast Concrete, poplar, latex paint, From performance THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH

OVER-BELIFES, 2019 Cast concrete, From performance THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH From THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH, 2019 a performance at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art. Photo by Evan Lalonde.

Toile découpée, 1970 Huile sur toile metissée Oil on canvas 197 x 250 cm 77.6 x 98.4 in

Peinture vraiment Résine sur grillage Resin on stainless steel mesh 145 x 145 cm 57.1 x 57.1 in abstraite, 2017

In 1969 Louis Cane’s first gallery exhibition (Givaudan, Paris) consisted of a group of unstretched canvases– sheets in fact, marked only by continuous rubber stamping of his name. He concluded this exercise in personal branding with the insolently tautological series Louis Cane artiste peintre français.
By 1970 Cane was done with youthful irony, inaugurating a genre of cut-out paintings, the toiles découpées, which he would exploit for several years. Like Jackson Pollock or Helen Frankenthaler, Louis Cane painted on unstretched canvas on the ground. But Cane digested the mentor of these artists, Clement Greenberg, as fast as the avant-garde critic appeared in Peinture: cahiers théoriques, the cutting-edge magazine published by Cane and his radical associates.

Cane’s incision in the canvas produces flaps which open a space on the wall. This space is not part of the painting yet remains integral to the picture. Thus, his paintings, which interact with both the floor plane and the wall, investigate the space of non-representation (what is cut out) and integrate it within the painting.
Last century, one saw these paintings as the formalist realization of a praxis. Today we are more tempted to admire the economy of means and the visual polyvalence. Back then, Louis Cane questioned pictorial space by considering Chinese painting. To liberate himself from the conventions of Renaissance perspective without renouncing pictorial space it was necessary to start with discourse. Today only the painting endures, and with it the work’s persisting pertinence.

Owner
Aron Gent
aron@documentspace.com
Director
Sibylle Friche
sibylle@documentspace.com
General Inquiries
info@documentspace.com

Gallery hours:
Tuesday-Saturday: 11am-6pm

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DOCUMENT is a commercial gallery located in Chicago that specializes in contemporary photography, film and media based art. The gallery has organized more than 40 solo exhibitions since its opening in 2011 and actively promotes the work of emerging national and international artists. Operating conjointly as a professional printmaking studio, DOCUMENT facilitates the production of works by artists from Chicago and the US. At this time we do not accept unsolicited submissions.