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Reception: Friday, January 10, 5-8pm

DOCUMENT is pleased to present Bundle Umbra, Christopher Meerdo’s third exhibition at the gallery. Drawing from hacker and whistleblower file caches sourced on the dark web, the exhibition considers what is seen and remains invisible within international information systems.

Routed through 3D displacement mapping, segments of the archives take the form of thermoformed and perforated plastic collage works. Each function as a light emission panel through the artist’s use of custom electronics and electroluminescent paint.  

The work draws from secondary and idiosyncratic symbols, handwritten notes, tables, and graphics located within the archives. The source material emerges from various activities from the past 30 years. This includes documents from Chinese secret prisons, Fraternal Order of Police confidential contracts, papers seized from the US embassy takeover in Tehran in the late 1970’s, and recently revealed banking disclosures from the Cayman Islands, among others.  

Noël Dolla

Text by Françoise-Claire Prodhon, April 2001 :

“But this rigorous work, voluntarily without an identifiable brand image, which the artist simultaneously suggests is close to Barnett Newman and to Marcel Duchamp, operates without absolute affirmation, running counter to any demonstrative desire. Dolla is not a lesson giver, he works with uncertainty, he questions the way we look, our point of view as spectators (literally and figuratively). He forces us to approach painting in a multiplicity of possible spaces (frontal to the wall, in the scale of a room or a landscape he presents, on the surface of an object); he makes us no longer consider the activity of the artist solely from the aspect of a production of images, or a simple exercise in style on a flat surface…
Dolla likes to work what he calls his “domestic side”: he uses modest and familiar objects which are those of everyday life for a housewife, the house painter, or angler. This vocabulary, set up since the late sixties, enables him to revive painting by exploring its topicality: the Géant flannel attributed to Chrons on which he wipes his brushes to the point of saturating it with material and colour, tells us as much about painting and its relationship to its time as a work by a master in a museum…”

‘In my work with tarlatan. I make use of resist colouring applied by roller and with overlaid layers from which escape the figuration of my lines, agglutinations, internal rhymes, dilutions, etc…, there too, I appreciate the scope of an object in which what is important to me is its figurality, extension, the reserve or application in the colour-field.

Extract from “Noël Dolla”, interview by Bernard Lamarche-Vadel,
in +-0, n.15, December 1976, p. 39.

He says: I roll, soak, unroll, cut, rub, tear,
Fold, glue, tear, build, dig, sow colour in the folds of the form.

Extract from “Il dit”, Noël Dolla, 5 March 1980, in +-0, n.31, December 1980, p. 27.

Tarlatan – ‘a very light cotton fabric, loosely woven but with plenty of dressing’ – first appeared in the works of Noël Dolla in late 1969. At the “Supports/Surfaces” exhibition at the Théâtre de Nice (June 1971), bands of tarlatan marked with points were laid out in space like a wave or like a string of lights undulating in the draughts over a space of about twenty metres. Hung along a wall, the colour dyeing the edges of the cotton became the ‘floating, free, fluid frame’ of a canvas freed of its stretcher. Dipped in successive baths of colour, once unrolled from ceiling to floor, the tarlatan revealed its mottled shades (1975-1976). Soaked, unrolled, cut, folded, assembled, glued, it now offered complex compositions of various shapes and dimensions (1979-1980).
In 1972, severely tried and filled with remorse for his participation in the ’72/72 – Twelve years of contemporary art in France” exhibition at the Grand Palais, Noël Dolla closed in on an intimate practice, the making of colourful flies (lures) and photographic work in various cemeteries that would result in the video Love Song (1973-1976). He closed in on himself, but also worked on one of the essential components of painting: colour.
One year after the ‘Admission free but not compulsory’ exhibition at Villa Arson (June-October 2013) and after a year of reflection on his work, Noël Dolla revived an ancient gesture in the form of folds. Folds/wrinkles on and towards a practice left fallow for a long time. Travel, trips/returns, questioning within the problem of turning in on oneself. The recent paintings, purposely entitled ‘Folds & withdrawals’, synthesise, condense, develop and unfold all his earlier experiments and the problem of an artist who has worked for over forty years “in the spirit of abstraction”.

Tarlatane, 1970 Acrylique sur tarlatane Acrylic on tarlatan 2000 x 20 cm 787.4 x 7.9 in

Chapter NY is pleased to announce שכינה (Shekinah), Erin Jane Nelson’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. The exhibition will present her most recent series of fabric-wrapped panel works and ceramic vessels.

Nelson’s practice is grounded in photography sourced from her personal archive of found and original images. She works serially, with each project delving into new conceptual frameworks as far ranging as the cultural anxiety around climate change, the sentience of octopuses, and the science fiction of our present moment. Her photographic elements merge onto unexpected support structures, their multiple references engaging the nuanced anxiety, conflict, and humor of the present and immediate future.

For this exhibition, Nelson embraces her Southern Jewish heritage as subject matter. The title of the exhibition, Shekinah, a word from rabbinical literature that means the feminine attributes of God, a sense of place in the world, a dwelling, has been Nelson’s framework for spiritual seeking. Based on research and photographs made while studying Judaism over the last year, she incorporates Jewish symbolism and archival photographs into this new work alongside her ongoing photographic practice documenting the environmental collapse of her home region.

Along with ceramics, found textiles and collaged photographs typical of earlier bodies of work, Nelson uses natural dying techniques that impregnate her works with the colors and ghosts of plants and insects. Her seeping and decaying forms, mixed with personally relevant subject matter, are inspired by poet Joyelle McSweeney’s concept of the necropastoral, a political-aesthetic space in which human depredations converge with nature’s decay. Coupled with an idealism of religion’s ability to heal and give guidance for mourning, Nelson leaves room for moments of respite and purpose within a fraught world.

Raised in the American South, Erin Jane Nelson lives and works in Atlanta, GA. In 2011 she received her BFA from The Cooper Union. Recent solo exhibitions include: Her Deepness, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, GA; Psychopompopolis, Document Gallery, Chicago; and Dylan, Hester, New York. Her work has been featured in group exhibitions at La Galerie, centre d’art contemporain, Noisy-le-Sec, France; Deli Gallery, Brooklyn; Van Doren Waxter, New York; Capital Gallery, San Francisco; Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Her work is currently included in Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950-2019 at the Whitney, which has recently acquired the artist’s work. Nelson will also be featured in an upcoming exhibition at the Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands.

EJN S Well 1 (2) website

Well 1, 2019
Found figurines, photographs, and resin on glazed stoneware
15 × 13 × 13 inches (38.10 × 33.02 × 33.02 cm)

Owner
Aron Gent
aron@documentspace.com
Director
Sibylle Friche
sibylle@documentspace.com
Gallery and Print Studio Associate
Cody Schlabaugh
info@documentspace.com

Gallery hours:
Tuesday-Saturday: 11am-6pm

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DOCUMENT is a commercial gallery located in Chicago that specializes in contemporary photography, film and media based art. The gallery has organized more than 50 solo exhibitions since its opening in 2012 and actively promotes the work of emerging national and international artists.Since 2016, DOCUMENT started exhibiting historical artists and has continued to anchor its program in a conversation between emerging voices and established figures. Operating conjointly as a professional printmaking studio, DOCUMENT facilitates the production of works by artists from Chicago and the US. The production studio allows some of the gallery artists to collaborate with DOCUMENT in both their exhibitions and their daily artistic practice by being in constant conversation about the realization and processes in their work.
At this time we do not accept unsolicited submissions.