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Reception: Thursday, June 27 from 12–8pm & Friday, June 28 from 12–6pm

DOCUMENT is pleased to announce our participation in Condo New York 2019 and would like to thank Marinaro Gallery for the invitation to exhibit a selection of our gallery artists in her exhibition space. The presentation will include works by John Opera, Mary Helena Clark and Sterling Lawrence whom have had numerous solo exhibitions at DOCUMENT. A reception will be held on Thursday, June 27th from 5-8 pm.


JOHN OPERA combines a deep interest in the visual characteristics of natural and scientific phenomena with a rigorous experimental approach to the techniques and apparatuses by which photographs have been defined and produced in. Opera often returns to antiquated—but by no means exhausted—photographic tools and processes, including pinhole imaging, and more recently the cyanotype and anthotype.

MARY HELENA CLARK is an artist working in film, video, and installation. Her work uses the language of collage, often bringing together disparate subjects and styles that suggest an exterior logic or code, to explore dissociative states through cinema. Working with quotation, the materiality of film, and incongruous sound/image relationships, Clark’s recent work explores shifting subjectivities and the limits of the embodied camera. Her films, such as After Writing (2008), And the sun flowers (2009), Sound Over Water (2009), By foot-candle light (2011), The Plant (2012), Orpheus (outtakes) (2012) and The Dragon is the Frame (2014), have been screened at International Film Festival Rotterdam, New York Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Wexner Center for the Arts (Columbus), Vox Populi (Philadelphia), Anthology Film Archives (New York), Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago), National Gallery of Art (Washington DC), and the Brooklyn Academy of Music, among others.

STERLING LAWRENCE reconstructs forms and images that belong to an aesthetic of everyday objects and backdrops whose purpose is to “streamline” and “enhance” our environment. In doing so, Lawrence’s work speaks to how bodies connect and relate to constructed spaces and designed objects exploring psychological, economic, and political histories. Taking influence from consumer culture and inconspicuous moments in architecture, Lawrence’s work often lays reverence for the viewer to claim description. Sculptures whose outward form exaggerate, mute, and or distort function complicate their imagined and therefore suggested utility. Most recently, Lawrence has been producing a series of monochrome wall works entitled “domesticated architecture”. This series takes influence from craftsman homes found in the artist’s home town and Patrick Caulfield’s serigraph prints from the 60’s and 70’s. The reliefs mimic the use of “flats,” a graphic building block used in printmaking. In “domesticated architecture,” grid structures support and organize silhouette flats that shadow the original source and Lawrence’s background in printmaking.

Andrew Norman Wilson

Andrew Norman Wilson is an artist based in New York. Recent and forthcoming exhibitions include the Gwangju Biennale (2016), the Berlin Biennale, the Bucharest Biennale (2016), Bread and Roses at the Museum of Modern Art Warsaw (2016), On Sweat, Paper and Porcelain at CCS Bard in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York (2015), Office Space at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco (2015), Art Post Internet at Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing (2014), Scars of Our Revolution at Yvon Lambert in Paris (2014), and Image Employment at MoMA PS1 in Queens, New York (2013). His work has screened in Les Rencontres Internationales, the New York Film Festival, Prospectif Cinema at the Centre Pompidou, #VOICEOVER at the Palais de Tokyo, the San Francisco International Film Festival, and the Images Festival. He has lectured at Oxford University, Harvard University, Universität der Künste Berlin, and CalArts. His work has been featured in Aperture, Art in America, Artforum, Buzzfeed, e-flux journal, Frieze, Gizmodo/Gawker, The New Yorker, and Wired. Wilson’s work is in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art Warsaw, the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami, the Stolbun Collection, Collection Lambert, and the the Kadist Foundation.

 

The ABC of Photography, Archival pigment print and artist frame, Edition of 3, 9 x 7 in, 2014

Museum Metallicum Autoris 35, Edition of 3, Archival pigment print and artist frame, 12 x 15 3/4 in, 2014

The Jungle Frontmatter, Archival pigment print and artist frame, Edition of 3, 8 1/4 x 5 1/3 in, 2014

The lives of saints 485, Archival pigment print and artist frame, Edition of 3, 9 x 5 in, 2014

An Exact Narrative of Man, Edition of 3, Archival pigment print and artist frame, 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 in, 2014

Reality Models, 2016 6 min 10 sec video

Andrew Norman Wilson, The Unthinkable Bygone, 2015, 2 min 20 sec video

Afterimage, Vol. 46, Number 2

Exhibition Review: Andrew Norman Wilson: Kodak

Andrew Norman Wilson: Kodak. Document. Chicago, Illinois: January 11–February 23, 2019| By Liz Park

Image 1. Still from Kodak (2018) by Andrew Norman Wilson; © 2018 Andrew Norman Wilson; courtesy the artist and DOCUMENT.

 

Andrew Norman Wilson’s thirty-two-minute video Kodak (2018) was the beating heart of his eponymous exhibition at DOCUMENT in Chicago. A series of prints that take inspiration from various Kodak products hung in an adjacent gallery while a stack of giveaway posters—of the company’s first digital camera from 1973 printed on recto and a text by Nick Irvin on verso—prepared those who entered a dark, curtained gallery. Irvin’s text introduced the video’s protagonist Rich as a mentally unstable former Kodak employee who became blind as a result of a workplace accident. These details emerge slowly, however, and in short bursts, like flickers of images that stitch together the stories of the character Rich and Kodak’s legendary founder George Eastman [Image 1].

“Your time is up,” alerts the high-pitched and tinny voice of a woman, beginning a narrative that is driven primarily by sound rather than images. A long minute passes with only darkness to accompany her increasingly aggravated chastising, dramatically peaking with “You have to stop now!” The first discernable image finally surfaces—a portrait of a bespectacled Eastman. A shaky voice that stands in for Eastman implores, “What is a photograph?” He answers himself: “. . . a dream, a reminder of how little you can actually capture.” Responsible for popularizing photography through consumer-grade technology, Eastman, as recorded in history and presented in this well-researched video, successfully tapped into the consumer’s desire to hold onto the fleeting moments of their mortal lives. Spiked with nostalgia, Eastman’s steady ruminations on life, photographic processes, and his business empire provide […]

Read the complete article here.

Owner
Aron Gent
aron@documentspace.com
Director
Sibylle Friche
sibylle@documentspace.com
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DOCUMENT is a commercial gallery located in Chicago that specializes in contemporary photography, film and media based art. The gallery has organized more than 40 solo exhibitions since its opening in 2011 and actively promotes the work of emerging national and international artists. Operating conjointly as a professional printmaking studio, DOCUMENT facilitates the production of works by artists from Chicago and the US. At this time we do not accept unsolicited submissions.